Jump to content
Salesforce and other SMB Solutions are coming soon. ×

Structure


WhiskyWolf

Recommended Posts

I've learned an enormous amount since I've been skulking around this cafe. While I knew the Filemaker commands available to me, I was never truly aware of the full potential of their power and functionality until I saw how many of you apply them to the problems and issues posted here.

 

Even seemingly little things, such as Anatoli's tip about numbering script names. It had never occured to me, but what a difference ...

 

Which brings me to my question ... Structure. Where do you learn it? How do you keep track of all the complex arguments? A button says "New Record", but part of its script "sets" a field that is used in another "Case" arguement, which sets a relationship, and validates a portal... goes to another layout ... sets another field, and then returns to the original layout. All the eye sees is that a new record was created. How do you NOT look at the field at a later date ... KNOW the data is correct... but have no idea how it got there?

 

I would imagine if "Expert 1" sent his solution to "Expert 2", Expert 2 would feel quite at home pulling it to pieces, and tracking the line of thought. Commonalities, such a "gGlobal"; Case vs. If statements; set field vs. copy/paste; creation of field names that include more than just the first thing you thought of that will fit in the "fieldname" window ... I would imagine both experts would have a similar methodology.

 

Books? Bitter experience? (Skulking around Filemaker Cafe's? .. smile.gif )

 

In any event, if no-one wants to tackle this question, I'd like to post a blanket "Thank-you" to all of you who give your time to help solve the questions and issues raised here. While I have no shame what-so-ever in tapping into the vast experience of some of the members here, I never, ever take it for granted. Thanks, indeed.

 

But I'd still like an answer to my "Structure" question ... laugh.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by WhiskyWolf:

[qb]

 

Which brings me to my question ... Structure. Where do you learn it? How do you keep track of all the complex arguments? A button says "New Record", but part of its script "sets" a field that is used in another "Case" arguement, which sets a relationship, and validates a portal... goes to another layout ... sets another field, and then returns to the original layout. All the eye sees is that a new record was created. How do you NOT look at the field at a later date ... KNOW the data is correct... but have no idea how it got there?

laugh.gif [/qb]

This is the beauty of Filemaker Pro. As you state the interface shows only a new record. Your users have no idea what is going on behind the scenes and they will leave you alone as long as all things work. Believe me you may have the greatest program in the world, but one mistake .........

 

As far as structure. It is what you the programmer want it to do.

 

Originally posted by WhiskyWolf:

[qb]

I would imagine if "Expert 1" sent his solution to "Expert 2", Expert 2 would feel quite at home pulling it to pieces, and tracking the line of thought. Commonalities, such a "gGlobal"; Case vs. If statements; set field vs. copy/paste; creation of field names that include more than just the first thing you thought of that will fit in the "fieldname" window ... I would imagine both experts would have a similar methodology.

laugh.gif [/qb]

Yes Expert 2 loves to pick apart Expert1's work. Even have received Dutch interface with English background and still get to understand what is going through their mind as they lay it out.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The "comments" function in scriptmaker can do a lot toward making reverse engineering easier. Even if it is you trying to pick apart a solution you created a year ago, one tends to forget why certain routines were used.

 

Used liberally throughout scripts, comments are road maps to the thought process of the programmer while he was creating the script.

 

Often, as one's knowledge and techniques increase, one does things differently that they didn't before know were possible. This makes it difficult to follow the thought process of earlier scripts. So explaining each step in a complicated script makes life a lot easier down the road. In fact, one can use comments to explain what external script was called and what it does. This overcomes FMP's shortsightedness in not labeling external scripts.

 

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use