Jump to content
Salesforce and other SMB Solutions are coming soon. ×

Find problems


blevey
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have a field that all of a sudden is not working on a find request. I have several records were the field has Open or Closed in it and when I do a find it comes back with "no records match this set of find request" but the field has data in it.....

 

any ideas?

 

Blevey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

any ideas?

Yes, This is an indication that the word index for the field has become corrupt.

 

The way to fix it is to go into the Define Fields dialog and explicitly turn indexing off for the field, then exit define fields (to save the change). Then go back in and enable indexing for the field again. That should correct the problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That fixed it... Any idea what could have caused it...

There are a few possible causes - and a few different kinds of index anomalies. They can be caused by a disk error, a program error and also by pasting control characters or other gremlins (eg copied from the web or other applications) in with data. Occasionally they are associated with more generral file corruption, but that is rare.

 

However if you are using 8.0, there are also some known issues that can affect indexes, which occur as a result of making changes to the database structure (eg if you delete a field that an auto-enter calc depends on, it can affect the index of the auto-enter calc field). These issues seem to have been fixed in version 8.5.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is your solution SERVED? It is a multi-user solution available to plural numbers of concurrent users? If so, do you have file sharing enabled on the host machine?

 

Yes it's served, yes plural concurrent users... now what do you mean be file sharing enabled on the host machine?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I mean file sharing. If it's a Windows PC, is the service called "Server" enabled? If it's a Mac, is "Personal File Sharing" or "Windows Sharing" activated for any active account?

 

In all cases, the proper answer is "hell no".

 

Next Question: how do your end users access the hosted files? Do you have them go to File menu, click Open Remote, and browse "Favorite Hosts" (which has your Host's IP entered)? Do you instead distribute launcher files which have run-on-open scripts that open the hosted file (identified by IP address of the host machine + filename, as set in Define: File References? (Those are all good answers.)

 

 

Or do you instead have them navigating to the hosted files via Network Neighborhood (or My Cute Li'l Network Places or whatever MS calls it now) or via the Macintosh Finder, and then double-clicking on the file itself?

 

Or double-clicking on an alias/shortcut that links to same?

 

Or do you use a launcher file that utlizes a defined File Reference that uses a file path as defined via either the Mac Finder or Network Neighborhood (etc)?

 

FILE SHARING CORRUPTS FILES

FILE SHARING CORRUPTS FILES

FILE SHARING CORRUPTS FILES

 

Do not EVER, EVER, turn on file sharing on a host box. Also do not back up live files via Retrospect or other backup sw. Also do not ever, ever, do file copies of any other sort, of files that are currently hosted. THOSE PROCEDURES CORRUPT FILES.

 

Corrupted files are no ^%$#@#^ fun. They don't always exhibit file corruption in black-and-white terms, where a corrupted file displays obvious symptoms like Server won't serve it or it won't let you open it as a guest when hosted. Sometimes it's nasty and pernicious and you don't notice how badly T@@#^^-ed-up it is until several months' worth of backups have been nothing but backups of corrupted file.

 

• Dedicated server. The host machine of any multiuser FileMaker database should be standalone, doing nothing else for a living but hosting the database. Goes extra-double-serious-important if you're using FileMaker Server. You don't run it on a machine already deployed as a file server, email server, Terminal Services server (for God's sake), web server, etc. Dedicated server. Just FileMaker.

 

• Nothing should ever launch a FileMaker shared database except using the fmnet:// protocol. Manually that means File menu, Open Hosts, Favorite Hosts (add IP of Host box if not already present), pick file from list. Automated, that means defining File Reference, fmnet:///filename.fp7 and then referencing that in a script.

 

• You can't backup live files. Backing up live files = copying live files. Bad bad bad bad bad. File corruption, both of source file and of copy. Nothing any good, nothing useful to restore form once corruption sets in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Next Question: how do your end users access the hosted files? Do you have them go to File menu, click Open Remote, and browse "Favorite Hosts" (which has your Host's IP entered)? Yes....

 

The file is hosted by FM Server 8 which handles the backups and the entire system is backed up as well. However it's not on a Dedicated server. I didn't know this was necessary.

 

Boy you've given me a lot to think about....keep me up at nights...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...and the entire system is backed up as well

 

Most likely massively not-good. If the live files are being backed up by backup sofware, you're introducing gradual corruption. Oh, and your backups aren't worth a damn either.

 

If your host is not FileMaker Server and is instead plain-vanilla FileMaker Pro you need to quit the application and then backup the closed/unserved files. If your host IS FileMaker Server, it has its own built-in backup routines, which should be the ONLY thing that is allowed to back up live served files. FmServer knows to pause and flush-cache all opened files, and to not un-pause them until backup is complete, which is functionally identical to closing the files before backup. No 3rd-party backup software is savvy to that, and therefore should not be used.

 

However it's not on a Dedicated server. I didn't know this was necessary.

 

Boy you've given me a lot to think about....keep me up at nights...

 

Dedicated server is pretty damn necessary. Absence of file sharing (AFS, SMB, pretty much anything that reads to and/or writes from disk, unless its absense means the OS does a nosedive) is a pretty good idea. I routinely disable on a permanent basis about 60% of windows server services, and turn of a %#@!-load of others on a manual basis where they only get kicked on on an as-needed basis. Same with OS X: turn off Spotlight indexing (important), turn off file sharing of every available type in the Sharing PrefsPane (important), kill Energy Saver mechanisms that might ever sleep the HD, and, as with Windows servers, don't try to use it for anything but FileMaker Server. Dedicated machine. Even if the only machine you can afford to dedicate is some elderly decrepitated iMac or Pentium II workstation, dedicated box. Seriously.

 

If you have the resources, what you REALLY want is a dedicated server, CPU is no big deal above and beyond today's server minumum (FmServer is just flat-out NEVER going to find a use for al available processor cycles), RAM is also no big deal at least beyond servrer minimum (FmServer isn't particularly RAM-hungry), BUT feed the server the most enormous and direct pipeline to the relevant network you can arrange, and the server should have seriously hi-performance network pipes (gigabit ethernet direct to corporate backbone is nice); and the FileMaker files themselves should be housed on the fastest of fast and ultrawide SCSI hard drives, if not a dedicated hardware (NOT software) RAID array designed for SPEED. FileMaker is disk-based. It flourishes when its files are on blazing-fast hard disks that nothing else occupies and nothing else attempts to read from or write to. On a dedicated machine. With no freaking file sharing. And no antivirus. Antivirus apps scan disks. The FileMaker protocol has never, ever, been used to promulgate a virus, and with all other networking protocols turned off, you aren't gonna get virused. If you can't stomach the idea of a Windows-based server not running any AV, get a MacOSX server. But seriously, no AV. Nothing ought to be speaking to that hard disk unless the OS just flat-out can't function without it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This thread is quite old. Please start a new thread rather than reviving this one.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use